NANOG 85 Agenda


NANOG 85 Agenda

Click on any talk title in the agenda to view the full abstract and speaker info.

Please note agenda is subject to change.

Sunday, June 5, 2022
Topic
Full Abstract

The NANOG 85 Hackathon will focus on the theme of Projects that Make a Difference.
Learn more at https://www.nanog.org/events/nanog-85-hackathon/

On Wednesday, May 25th, we will hold the Hackathon welcome, introduction, infrastructure tutorial, idea-pitching, and team-forming session over Zoom; this session will be recorded. Saturday, June 4th, will be the start of the hackathon; this day will be all virtual regardless whether or not you are at the conference venue. Sunday, June 5th, will be a true hybrid day with people continuing to work virtually as well as dedicated facilities (workspace, wifi, etc) for those at the conference venue.

The Hackathon starts with a brief welcome and introduction, tutorial, and team formation on Wednesday, May 25, at 1:00pm Eastern. Hacking begins virtually at 1:00pm Eastern, Saturday, June 4. The hacking ends at 5:00pm Eastern, Sunday, June 5, when the team presentations will begin.The Hackathon will conclude around 6:00pm Eastern Sunday, June 5. We have dedicated Support/Help Hours on Saturday from 1:00pm - 4:00pm Eastern virtually via Zoom and again on Sunday from 12:00pm - 5:00pm Eastern in a hybrid format.

Monday, June 6, 2022
Topic
Full Abstract

New to NANOG ? Don’t miss our Newcomers Breakfast for an opportunity to network with fellow newcomers and learn more about NANOG - both the community and the organization.

Topics to be covered include:
What is NANOG
What is a NOG
NANOG Governance
NANOG Resources
NANOG 85 Program Information

Speakers
  • Speaker Tina Morris - Amazon Web Services
  • James Shank
  • Cat Gurinsky - Immortal Tiger Kenpo Karate
Full Abstract

Vint Cerf will share his thoughts on IPv6 as we celebrate the 10 year anniversary of World IPv6 Launch Day.

Speakers
  • Speaker Vinton G. Cerf
Full Abstract

Usually we support with the Global NOG Alliance, colleagues from the community who want to set up a new NOG meeting. For this we provide everything necessary, free of charge.

Base is a Indico system, which includes CfP, agenda scheduling, registration, etc. In addition, we have a speaker database that we can use to help newcomers. We can also create a sub-account through our bank and the organizers of a new NOG meeting will receive a virtual and/or physical debit credit card to be able to pay for everything related to the NOG Meeting. In addition, we have the opportunity to support NOG meetings with a little money from our budget. Everything at volunteer level and everything free of charge.

But the February 24, 2022 changed a lot in the world and so did us.

Two weeks after the start of the war in Ukraine, I drove to Ukraine with a friend with two trucks (40 tons and 7.5 tons) to hand over humanitarian goods there.

When I called a board call on March 11, 2022 to share my experiences, we decided to help as a team. And we created a task force within the Global NOG Alliance. And that was the birth of the project: Keep Ukraine Connected.

We had nothing, the only thing we had.... was a mission. Mission to help our friends from Ukraine, to help ISPs. All logistics companies had stopped the service and some action had to be taken. The operators of the on-site Internet infrastructure needed equipment for the destroyed infrastructure/parts of the destroyed infrastructure.

We started from scratch and by March 2022 we already saw ourselves as a link between the communities. As a link between users and manufacturers. We have the contacts and wanted to use them and create synergies. Within three weeks we managed to collect around 2 tons of equipment. This equipment came from Germany/ Europe and also the USA. Within three weeks we programmed a Supply&Demand Database where donors and those in need can register. Donors can enter what they want to donate and requesters can enter their needs there.

on March 8th, 2022 I started a small European tour to collect equipment with a 7.5 ton truck. So I started in Berlin, via the Czech Republic, Austria to Slovenia. After the SEE10 meeting in Ljubljana, i continued via Austria, the Czech Republic and Poland to the Ukraine, where I met our local contacts to load the 2 tons of equipment onto another truck.

We currently work with the Ministry of Digital Transformation, The Association of Rights Holders and Content Providers, The Ukrainian Internet Association and DEPS. DEPS is our local donation distributor to get all the equipment we bring to Ukraine to the right companies.

In our presentation, which I would like to do with Jan Zorz (6connect), I would like to show how we see our global community and how important it is to help one another in difficult times. We refrain from any political discussions or support. We support our friends from the NOG community and also want to be a bit of an example that our community doesn't think in borders, colors, races or genders. Don't talk, just do anything is our motto and we want to pass this on and motivate other supporters to support us. Thank you for a possible acceptance of our CfP. I will submit the presentation slides asap after our internal approval.

Speakers
  • Speaker René Fichtmüller - Flexoptix GmbH
  • Jan Zorz - 6connect
Recordings
Files
Full Abstract

This tutorial includes a presentation of the IPv6 addressing architecture, the IPv6 header, IPv6 extensibility, IPv6 Neighbor Discovery (ND), and Stateless Address Auto Configuration (SLAAC). While it highlights the advantages of IPv6 over IPv4, it also examines some IPv6 features that have not been successful. Finally, it considers why IPv6 has not yet overtaken IPv4, 27 years after its deployment.

Ron Bonica: Ron Bonica is a Distinguished Engineer at Juniper Networks, specializing in IPv6 and Segment Routing. He is active in the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), having authored or co-authored twenty RFC documents and served three two-year terms as co-director of the IETF Operations and Management Area. Ron currently co-chairs the IETF V6OPS and OPSEC Working Groups. Prior to joining Juniper Networks, Ron was employed by a major Internet Service Provider and operated an Layer 3 Virtual Private Network for U.S. Government customers.
Speakers
  • Speaker Ron Bonica - Juniper Networks
Full Abstract

NANOG knows the importance of networking! Some of the tables at lunch will have "Table Topics" for you to be able to meet up with other that wish to network around the same topic.

Network Management
Automation
BGP Security
Routing
Traffic Management and Policy
Job Hunting
Peering
Newcomers Networking Follow-up
War Stories - The Time I Thought I'd Get Fired

Sponsors:
Full Abstract

This presentation is both a celebration of the work performed to get IPv6 adoption to this point in North America. It also covers what work remains to continue to further IPv6 usage.

Speakers
  • Speaker Scott Hogg
Full Abstract

In January 2011 World IPv6 Day which would take place in June of the same year was announced. This global event was a milestone for content providers and broadband networks alike highlighting a first for the global deployment of IPv6. This event represented the first large-scale enablement of IPv6 for mainstream content across the Internet. One short year later World IPv6 Launch took place and this time included large scale IPv6 enablement for eye-ball or broadband networks and for many native IPv6 was deployed. 2012 marked a change for the Internet that would continue to unfold over years to come.

In the years that followed adoption increased, however, over the years following the boom of IPv6 adoption technology shifted. Namely to the cloud, fueling a wide range of innovations unfortunately still based on the legacy version of the Internet Protocol.

Ten years later come hear what some of the original organizers and participants have to say about the turning point events from 2011 and 2012 as well as commentary about the adoption of IPv6 spanning the last decade. With this being a milestone year for World IPv6 come hear our esteemed panel in the first of two sister events planned for this year including those that began their journey after the World IPv6 events. This panel will also discuss their views of the years that followed the global events including what the road ahead looks like for the adoption of IPv6.

The latter portion of the panel discussion will be dedicated to the following question “What IPv6 advancing event is required next? Do we need one at all and if yes, when?” Done properly our community will once again illustrate the power of collaboration fueling the next and hopefully last major push for IPv6 deployment.

Jason Fesler: Jason cut his teeth at a small ISP in the mid 90's, back when dialup was the deal, and fractional T1s were awesome. He then "grew up" when joining Inktomi (later bought by Yahoo!), managing large scale application and compute environments. During that time, Jason built and still operates test-IPv6.com, as a public (and ad-free) service. Today, he works in Apple's infrastructure team.
Speakers
  • Moderator Jan Zorz - 6connect
  • John Jason Brzozowski
  • Panelist Ron Broersma
  • Jason Fesler
  • Madhura Kale
  • Erik Nygren
  • Paul Saab
  • Mark Townsley
  • Matthew Wilder - TELUS
Recordings
Files
Full Abstract

ARIN update presented by John Sweeting.

John Sweeting: John Sweeting is the Chief Customer Officer of the American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN), responsible for the overall development, direction and operation of the department. Prior to joining ARIN staff, he served 12 years on the ARIN Advisory Council, 6 of which he was the Chair, and 1 year on the Address Supporting Organization’s Address Council (ASO AC). John served on the Consolidated RIR IANA Stewardship Proposal (CRISP) team which was convened in December 2014 to guide development of the Number Community response to the IANA Stewardship Transition Coordination Group’s RFP.
Speakers
  • Speaker John Sweeting - ARIN
Full Abstract

BGP Flowspec has been a useful tool for permitting operators to mitigate DDoS attacks. However, as much as it's been a good tool, it's also been a sharp source of pain. Protocol bugs, line card bugs, odd limitations in platform support have made this useful tool a challenge to deploy.

This talk is a brief review of why flowspec has been challenging both to operators and to implementors, and highlight upcoming work in IETF to address some of the issues while attempting to create the ability to deploy next-generation features.

Jeffrey Haas: Jeffrey Haas is a Distinguished Engineer at Juniper Networks where he works on the implementation and specification of BGP. Jeffrey is a Chair at the IETF IDR (inter-domain routing) Working Group where BGP is standardized. Additionally, in IETF, Jeffrey is a Chair for the BFD (bi-directional forwarding detection) Working Group. Jeffrey has been involved in working on Internet technologies since the late 90's where he worked at a small tier-3 ISP doing everything from helping people setup dial-up networking to helping maintain the company's Internet routing. Since then, he's worked at the NextHop startup that commercialized the GateD software; at Arbor Networks where he worked on routing, flow analytics, and management software; and most recently with Juniper. Jeffrey's day job is a mix of work on code, standards, and working with customers solving interesting problems. For fun, Jeffrey spends his off hours as an active participant in the Society for Creative Anachronism (SCA) and thoroughly enjoys a good, dark beer.
Speakers
  • Speaker Jeffrey Haas
Sponsors:
Full Abstract

North American ISPs have a botnet problem. In this talk, we present results from a one year study of more than five thousand DDoS attacks observed at North American ISPs. We focus on VoIP phones, DVR, compromised cloud or other CPE / IoT devices coopted into large-scale DDoS botnets. We provide estimates of the scale, growth and distribution of botnet by ISP and device type. We show that botnet based DDoS is rapidly eclipsing all other forms of DDoS, including Amplified / spoofed which declined by more than 1/3 since our last NANOG presentation

Speakers
  • Speaker Craig Labovitz
Full Abstract

This presentation discusses automation that Meta has implemented to manage Peering requests that are usually sent by email to [email protected] - and sharing details on why we wanted this automation, what we did to achieve it and why we selected PeeringDB OAuth. We know we can automate more, and we’ll be sharing our plans for this, and encouraging other operators to consider a similar approach.

Speakers
  • Speaker Jenny Ramseyer
  • Ben Ryall
Full Abstract

The forum provides time for attendees to meet and network with others in the peering community present at NANOG.

Peering Representatives, who completed and submitted the form will have a dedicated highboy table for up to 2 representatives. They will be able to distribute business cards, and provide a white paper or 1 sheet marketing page. Please note: any other type of giveaway is not allowed.

Complete the form here: https://www.nanog.org/events/nanog-85/peering-forum/

Full Abstract

NANOG Social Event co-sponsored with Team Cymru and Montreal Internet Exchange

Location: Bier Markt
Address: 1221 René-Lévesque Blvd W
Montreal, Quebec

*NANOG Badge required for entry

*Temperature Checks before entry

https://www.thebiermarkt.com/en/locations/qc/montreal/1221-boul.-r%C3%A9n%C3%A9-levesque-ouest

Tuesday, June 7, 2022
Topic
Full Abstract

Sylvie will speak to us about developing the Internet during a pandemic and experiences building a submarine cable during a pandemic (all without travels...)

Speakers
  • Speaker Sylvie LaPerriere - Google
Full Abstract

In 2016, the conclusion of a study conducted in 22,000 publicly traded company in 91 countries by The Peterson Institute for International Economics, revealed that the ones with women in leadership roles had reported 6% higher profit. While this could be attributed to several factors, one cannot underestimate the unique values those determined and hard-working leaders brought to their industries. Fast-forward to 2022 as the world prepares to embrace more relaxed COVID-related restrictions, opportunities such as working remotely are further expected to pave the way for a higher percentage of women to enter the job market.

This panel will discuss the facets of leadership, challenges, successes, and opportunities.

Cat Gurinsky: Cat Gurinsky is a senior network engineer working on global large scale datacenter deployments. In previous network engineering roles for higher education and data center companies before that, she has worked on everything from enterprise and wireless deployments to internet exchanges and data centers. She first started working in network engineering in 2007 and began attending NANOG in 2009. Cat has previously served NANOG as part of the Development Committee from 2011-2012. She has served on the program committee since 2019 in the roles of secretary and vice-chair prior to becoming the current chair, which also makes her the current PC liaison on the NANOG board. Cat has a passion for BGP, Python, Arista eAPI, network tools, automation and anything that can help make life easier in large scale networks.
Speakers
  • Moderator Cat Gurinsky - Immortal Tiger Kenpo Karate
  • Panelist Jezzibell Gilmore - PacketFabric
  • Nikki Johnson
  • Johnnie Konstantas
  • Debbie Taylor Moore
Sponsors:
Full Abstract

Join us for the Women in Technology Lunch and hear a profound case one of the biggest personal challenge that is common to Women. A 10 minute "real talk" (fear of being vulnerability defied) will explore a real life example of its amplified impact on a woman in the tech industry. This will challenge you to reflect, maybe it resonates with your experience (woman, man or other gender identity); or contemplate your positions of strength to help others along.

It is in these moments of vulnerability that we get to pull each other in, pull each other up, break biases (self-impose or systemic) and empower every woman in Tech.

Sponsors:
Full Abstract

Operating a hyperscale network at scale reliably - abstract/simulate/emulate/validate:
1. Abstraction through compartmentalization and self-contained routing building blocks
2. Simulation vs emulation - when and why
3. Validation through assertion - continues validation and comparison of intended and operational states.

Jeff Tantsura: Jeff Tantsura has been in the networking space for 25+ years and has authored/contributed to many RFC's and patents, worked in both, SP and vendor environments. He is co-chair of IETF Routing Working Group, chartered to work on New Network Architectures and Technologies, including protocol independent YANG models and Next Gen Routing Protocols as well as co-chair of RIFT (Routing in Fat Trees) Working Group chartered to work on the new routing protocol that specifically addresses Fat Tree topologies typically seen in the Data Center environment. Jeff serves the Internet Architecture Board (IAB). His focus has been on 5G transport and integration with RAN, IoT, MEC, Low Latency networking and Data modeling. He’s also a board member of SF Bay Area ISOC Chapter. Jeff is Sr. Principal Network Architect at Azure (Microsoft) focusing on new technologies with 5 years horizon as well as high performance networking in AI/ML clusters.
Speakers
  • Speaker Jeff Tantsura - Microsoft
Full Abstract

Metro Ethernet networks have evolved from pure layer 2 architectures based on commodity switching to IP/MPLS architectures that are more scalable and reliable, but also more costly and complex. We discuss an emerging architectural approach that builds on low cost, commodity, disaggregated switching to create a scalable, resilient IP underlay and a simplified, automated service delivery overlay based on VXLAN and SDN control. We also describe how this architecture has been deployed in a US-based broadband Internet Service Provider (ISP) network.

Marco Pessi: Technology and networking enthusiast focusing on use case pioneering, architectural analysis and design, and product definition and development.
Speakers
  • Speaker Marco Pessi
Full Abstract

The ‘edge’ is an overloaded word in the industry, and can mean several different things to different stakeholders, depending on the industry and use case. The main purpose of the edge is to bring compute and storage closer to where is needed, providing lower latency and distributed processing. Important benefits for applications like Autonomous Vehicles, Gaming and Healthcare. Switches not only need to connect the servers within the edge, but also need to connect the edge to the central Datacenters, potentially those two functions collapse in the same switch .
Kubernetes is the preferable cloud management solution at the Edge and can also serve as a small and nimble network management system: By design Kubernetes can be used to manage the network: A key characteristic of Kubernetes is that its true declarative API can be extended with ‘custom resource’ that can be used to encode domain knowledge for specific applications. The Kubernetes declarative API can then be used to configure the network and enforce policies.
On this session we will bring an introduction how could you take advantage of GNMI/YANG standards, to manage network devices, and Kubernetes CRDs, and automate the network requirements in the underlay network. We'll bring some examples of use cases that can show the great potential of those technologies combined.

Mauricio Rojas: Mau is being working in the IT Industry for more than two decades, most of this time, leading the introduction of new technologies for Data Centers and Cloud in new markets. Originally from Santiago of Chile, he's currently working as Principal Consulting Engineer for Network Automation and rPLM in Nokia, supporting US and Canada. Continuously testing the limits of use cases for Kubernetes and network automation tools in the Data Center and the Edge. Mau's also passionate with art (Instagram: p1nrojas), using what is left of his creativity at work into the canvas or digital illustrations.
Speakers
  • Speaker Mauricio Rojas
Full Abstract

There are a limited number of IPv4 addresses in existence—only 4.3 billion—and IPv4 exhaustion has become a major issue in the industry as the world is slow to adopt IPv6. For a new buyer or seller entering the market, it can become overwhelming to understand the basic process of transferring IPv4 space, protecting themselves from fraud, and ensuring their businesses receive resources on the right delivery time table. During this panel we’ll be hearing from a couple of experienced participants in the IPv4 market that can expand on mitigating transaction risks for buyers and sellers, evaluating pricing in an opaque market, using an IP address sale as an opportunity to upgrade your network, and navigating ARIN's transfer process.

Amy Potter: Amy Potter is a Sr. Technical Business Developer at AWS, focusing on IP address acquisition. Prior to this she spent several years working as an IPv4 broker where she worked with ISPs, hosting companies, datacenters and others to acquire IPv4 address space and navigate RIR transfer policies. Amy led the creation of an IPv4 market platform in order to increase transparency and efficiency in the IPv4 market. Amy is interested in lending her expertise in the IPv4 market to help create policies that make sense in a post-IPv4 exhaustion world.
Chris Drumgoole: Chris Drumgoole is executive vice president and chief operating officer (COO) for DXC Technology. Chris has primary accountability for driving DXC’s day-to-day business operations while supporting change management initiatives that are aligned with the company’s overall transformation journey. He is responsible for DXC’s business and administrative operations including global supply chain, the procure-to-pay lifecycle, DXC’s technology strategy, operations, and infrastructure, as well as the company's Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) practice.
Tina Morris: Tina Morris serves as Chair of the NANOG Board of Directors and is a Senior Technical Business Development Manager at Amazon Web Services focused primarily on IPv4 and IPv6 address resource strategy. In addition, Tina is currently serving as Vice-Chair of the ARIN Board of Trustees and participates actively within the Global RIR community.
John Sweeting: John Sweeting is the Chief Customer Officer of the American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN), responsible for the overall development, direction and operation of the department. Prior to joining ARIN staff, he served 12 years on the ARIN Advisory Council, 6 of which he was the Chair, and 1 year on the Address Supporting Organization’s Address Council (ASO AC). John served on the Consolidated RIR IANA Stewardship Proposal (CRISP) team which was convened in December 2014 to guide development of the Number Community response to the IANA Stewardship Transition Coordination Group’s RFP.
William Sylvester: William Sylvester is the Executive Vice-President of Addrex, Inc. William has over 25 years of experience as an executive of core Internet infrastructure, including working for Network Solutions/VeriSign on the InterNIC project. He has spent the past ten years collaborating with global communities to help the Internet to keep growing while we work on adopting IPv6.
Speakers
  • Moderator Amy Potter - AWS
  • Panelist Chris Drumgoole
  • Tina Morris - Amazon Web Services
  • John Sweeting - ARIN
  • William Sylvester - Addrex, Inc.
Full Abstract

In October 2019, I presented “Some boring network engineering interview questions and how to replace them with smart ones” at NANOG 77 in Austin, TX (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g35UumfZ-H4&t=941s). An attempt to challenge the status quo around the quality of interview processes that was a new and different topic at the time. The recording of the session on YouTube has had one of the highest number of views and the authors received numerous questions and positive feedback. This time for NANOG 85, we are submitting a follow-up topic "The Anatomy of the Most Challenging Network Engineering Interview Question".

Speakers
  • Speaker Kam Agahian
Full Abstract

Efficient analysis and collection of deeply inspected, high throughput network traffic is hard… especially as the trend towards globally distributed deployments continues.

pktvisor (https://pktvisor.dev) is a free and open source analytics agent designed to address this challenge. It can analyze flow, packet capture, dnstap and other inputs, combining deep traffic analysis with data sketch algorithms to efficiently extract counts, top-k heavy hitters, set cardinality, quantiles and other key information from data streams directly on the edge. The result is lightweight time series metrics that plug into modern observability stacks.

Orb (https://getorb.io) is a related open source project that acts as a control tower for a distributed fleet of agents, providing fleet and configuration management along with data collection and sinking functionality, accessible via web UI and REST API.

Together their goal is to deliver immediately actionable insights local to the traffic source and simultaneously collected and integrated into global result sets.

This talk will introduce the origin of the tools, discuss the goals and status of the projects, and look to the future as they extend beyond traffic analysis and into general network debugging and analytics embedded at the edge.

Shannon Weyrick: Shannon Weyrick is VP Research and Fellow at NS1. A 20+ year veteran of internet infrastructure, Shannon is an accomplished technical architect, developer, and leader whose experience encompasses both development and operations of globally distributed platforms. A regular open source contributor, he has led and worked on a wide range of infrastructure projects from high-performance servers to novel programming languages and runtimes, and he enjoys writing and speaking at industry conferences.
Speakers
  • Speaker Shannon Weyrick
Wednesday, June 8, 2022
Topic
Full Abstract

Don’t miss our Community Meeting for an opportunity to hear about what is happening with NANOG and the Program Committee.

Edward McNair: Edward McNair is the Executive Director of the North American Network Operators Group (NANOG). He is also the co-founder of Kaskadian, an agency that provides branding, marketing and sales support for startups and new businesses. Prior to Kaskadian, Edward served as Chief Executive Officer for Verilan, an IT company that delivered just-in-time, enterprise-quality networks. Previously, he was Vice President of Internet Marketing for R2C, a leading direct marketing agency, and was Creative Director for the WiMAX Forum, a global Internet and telecom consortium. In the computer industry, Edward has developed corporate training solutions for Nike, Adidas, Columbia Sportswear, Kaiser Permanente, and FEI, among others. In addition, he has delivered professional services to NANOG, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), Facebook, Intel® and Mentor Graphics. Edward also developed the first web design program at the Pacific Northwest College of Art where he taught web and graphic design and interactive media courses for more than a dozen years. In his free time, Edward is involved in community theatre aimed at supporting local charities. His most recent production was playing the lead in the musical "Oklahoma!”
Cat Gurinsky: Cat Gurinsky is a senior network engineer working on global large scale datacenter deployments. In previous network engineering roles for higher education and data center companies before that, she has worked on everything from enterprise and wireless deployments to internet exchanges and data centers. She first started working in network engineering in 2007 and began attending NANOG in 2009. Cat has previously served NANOG as part of the Development Committee from 2011-2012. She has served on the program committee since 2019 in the roles of secretary and vice-chair prior to becoming the current chair, which also makes her the current PC liaison on the NANOG board. Cat has a passion for BGP, Python, Arista eAPI, network tools, automation and anything that can help make life easier in large scale networks.
Speakers
  • Speaker Edward McNair - NANOG
  • Cat Gurinsky - Immortal Tiger Kenpo Karate
Full Abstract

The Domain Name System (DNS) has evolved to include new, longer top-level domain (TLD) names, as well as TLDs and email addresses in various languages and scripts. The Universal Acceptance (UA) of these Internet identifiers means that they work seamlessly with all Internet-enabled applications, devices, and systems, some of which include email tools, webservers, content management systems, and more. Achieving UA-readiness is necessary for providing broader Internet access to global end users and driving digital inclusivity. Join the session to learn about the challenges and solutions for making UA a reality, including the gaps that need to be addressed by the technical community.

Sarmad Hussain: Sarmad Hussain is with ICANN’s Internationalized Domain Names (IDN) and Universal Acceptance (UA) Programs. Earlier, Sarmad was a professor of Computer Science and held the IDRC Research Chair position in Multilingual Computing. His research has focused on developing computing solutions for Asian languages, including research in linguistics, localization, speech processing, and computational linguistics. He was an active member of the ICANN community before joining ICANN.
Speakers
  • Speaker Sarmad Hussain
Full Abstract

Everyone is doing RPKI nowadays, but ... how does one troubleshoot issues within RPKI itself?

Getting RPKI Route Origin Validation going is straightforward: install a validator and point the EBGP routers to the RTR service endpoints. But what kind of files is the validator really pulling in? How? How to decode the binary formatted files into something human readable? What kind of references do the files contain towards each other? What the heck even is a "Signed Object"?

In this presentation I'll share an overview of the data structures contained inside ROAs, GBRs, and BGPsec Router Keys, and explain how to use BSD/Linux utilities to inspect this type of data.

Job Snijders: Job Snijders is a Principal Engineer at Fastly where he analyzes and architects global networks for future growth. Job has been actively involved in the Internet community in both operational, engineering, and architectural capacity, as a frequent presenter at network operator events such as NANOG, ITNOG, DKNOG, RIPE, NLNOG & APRICOT, and in a number of community projects for over 15 years. Job is co-chair of the IETF GROW working group, co-chair of the RIPE Routing Working Group, vice president of PeeringDB, director of the Route Server Support Foundation, manager of the IRRd v4 project, member of the RIPE NCC Executive Board, and art director for the OpenBSD project. Job's special interests are BGP routing policies, RPKI based routing security, and Internet scale PKIX-RPKI & BGP deployments. Job helps maintain several tools such as IRRd, rpki-client, bgpq4, OpenBGPD, irrtree, rtrsub, and irrexplorer, and is active in the IETF where they have coauthored or contributed to RFCs and Internet-Drafts. Job also is an OpenBSD developer.
Speakers
  • Speaker Job Snijders - Fastly
Full Abstract

NANOG 85 Hackathon Recap

Full Abstract

Following up on interest in learning how other NOGs work, we're bringing together five NOGs in a panel to give a quick overview of their Modus Operandi and general philosophy.

Starting with a brief intro from NANOG, the format is short ~5 minute NOG presentations followed by a panel discussion around the benefits of the different models especially in the age of Covid. We would like to get audience interaction driving the Q&A section.

The NOGs represneted on the panel are:
NLNOG, Netherlands
SiNOG, Slovenia
SAFNOG, Southern Africa
UKNOF, UK
DENOG, Germany
ENOG, Eurasian

Sergey Myasoedov: Sergey Myasoedov is an independent consultant. His areas of interest are the new key Internet technologies, especially DNSSEC and IPv6. Sergey has been active in the RIPE community since the RIPE 56 Meeting. He also serves the regional community as chair of the ENOG Programme Committee and local Czech and Slovak NOG since 2018. Before starting his own company in 2007, he worked as a NOC Engineer and Chief of the NOC Department in Russian telecommunication companies. He graduated from Saint Petersburg State Technological University in Russia.
Speakers
  • Moderator Fearghas McKay - FLEXOPTIX GmbH
  • Panelist Melchior Aelmans - Juniper Networks
  • Denesh Bhabuta
  • Patrick Bussmann
  • Vincent Celindro - Juniper Networks
  • Portia Rabonda
  • Jan Zorz - 6connect
  • Speaker Sergey Myasoedov
Recordings
Files
Full Abstract

ECMP is a key in today’s IP network. It provides both efficiency and resilience. However, the detecting and troubleshooting of these ECMP paths remains a big challenge that faces many operators. FIB corruption or FIB misconfiguration at any node is one among many issues that can happen and may lead packets to follow a non ECMP Path.
Path Tracing is a new solution that reveals all the unknows about ECMP. It allows operator to detect the currently available ECMP paths. They can also detect the ECMP Paths that were available at a given time in the past. Operators will be able also to know whether packets are following an ECMP Path or not. In addition, they can detect where packets are being drifted from the ECMP Path. Moreover, Path Tracing provides operators accurate end-to-end delay, per-hop delay, and the load of each interface that forwards the packet along the path.
The Path Tracing dataplane is optimized for HW linerate implementation in the base HW forwarding pipeline. It requires minimum packet header parsing and processing. As a result, it can be implemented using a minimum number of micro code instructions.
Path Tracing has also a rich ecosystem that includes several implementations in merchant silicon (Broadcom, Cisco, Marvell, others) and open source (Linux, VPP, P4, others).
The solution is currently being standardized in the SPRING WG at IETF (https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/draft-filsfils-spring-path-tracing/).
In this presentation, we will review the path tracing solution and its ecosystem

Speakers
  • Speaker michael valentine
Full Abstract

Optical fiber carries over 95% of terrestrial internet and private network traffic, and over 99% of international traffic via undersea cables. It is a miraculous medium, but it has fundamental limits in terms of the combination of capacity and reach. With almost 5 billion kilometres of optical fiber already installed, there is a strong incentive to extract as much capacity from existing fiber as possible.
In this tutorial we explain what those fundamental limits are, and what we can do to get as close as we can to them based on a hierarchy of lowest impact to highest impact on the network:
- The lowest impact implies using both the existing optical fibers in the ground today, and the existing line systems that are installed on those fibers.
- Involving more investment would be to use existing fibers, but to enhance and upgrade the line systems.
- And the highest investment option would be to deploy new fiber types.

We will explain each of these options, including giving an explanation of emerging fiber technologies. We will also attempt to show the potential increase in capacity from each of these options.

Speakers
  • Speaker Geoff Bennett
Full Abstract

Like many tasks, draining traffic off core routing device should be a simple task, but as you dive deeper into it (depending on the architecture) can become a complicated task with many moving parts to track and tasks to complete. This talk is going to walk through the process I went through to document, understand, automate, and improve the task of draining traffic off a routing device to be able to perform maintenances more often with low impact to customers. This talk is is both about the tool which was created but also about the process, and the iterative nature to get the tool to the state it's in now.

Charles Rumford: Charles Rumford currently works for Deft as network engineer on the operations team. His main responsibilities include routing, network design, systems administration, network design, and automation. He has a love for IT infrastructure and ensuring it meets the needs of his users. "Making events non-events" and "no one should know we've done anything" are his primary guiding principles for designs and work. Usiblity is also a primary concern, as what's the point of building something if no one uses it... Outside of the work space, Charles doesn't stray to far from the technology path. Recently, he has joining the planning committee for the The WOPR Summit and the Blue Team Village @ DEFCON. His primary roles is to support conference IT infrastructure to ensure a smooth conference for staff, speakers, and attendees. When Charles isn't mucking around with strange uses of BGP or protocol development for a 250 baud wireless backhaul network, he spends a great deal of time ringing church tower bells, biking, and knitting up a storm. www.tallwireless.com
Speakers
  • Speaker Charles Rumford - Deft/TallWireless
Full Abstract

Power costs involve both consumption and provisioning. Traditional approaches to provisioning in large systems (e.g., Cisco ASR 9000, NCS 5500, Juniper MX/PTX, etc) tend to overestimate power requirements and push operators toward populating more power supplies than they really need. This is exacerbated by the wide range of optics power in the 400G generation (up to 800W / RU), which break traditional static approaches to power budgeting. Improving provisioning can save money (fewer PSUs and power feeds), free up facility resources (e.g., consume less cooling budget), and still prevent brownouts. It can also improve the efficiency of PSUs (they are most efficient at 30-100% load so too many PSUs can waste power).

My experience is in leading enhancements to address this for Cisco's 8000 series, but the concepts apply to many platforms and operators will benefit if they are applied more broadly.

In this talk, I'd like to encourage operators to revisit this area of sw/facility interaction as a way to explore efficiency improvements.

Lane Wigley: Lane is a technical marketing engineer at cisco with a focus on high end SP/Web-scale router platforms going all the way back to the 7500 and 12000 Series. Some of his recent work has focused on power characterization/optimization, which is becoming critical to help network operators define, track, and meet their sustainability goals.
Speakers
  • Speaker Lane Wigley
Speakers
  • Speaker Cat Gurinsky - Immortal Tiger Kenpo Karate


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